Security Tips

Are you doing your best to be secure? Check back often for tips, new and popular resources and our most recent updates on emerging security threats.

If you think your account may have been compromised, contact us.

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Security Tips

Beware Wi-Fi Hotspots

Any info you send or receive on an open Wi-Fi hotspot is visible to anyone who knows how to look – use a VPN (secured connection) instead

Practice ATM Safety

Be wary of anyone offering to help, don’t proceed with the transaction if the screen offers unfamiliar options, don’t reenter your pin if it eats your card

Close All Tabs

It’s a good idea to close all your other browser sessions and tabs before you log into online banking – and always be sure to log out when you’re done

Don't Touch Spam

If you don’t recognize the sender, don’t open the email – don’t reply, and don’t get tricked by a subject line that says, “Remember me?”

Practice Software Safety

Use anti-virus, anti-spyware software and keep it updated; set up a firewall; keep all your technology updated with the latest security patches

Use Strong Passwords

Make every password unique, at least eight characters long, made of uppercase, lowercase and special characters, which contain no personal info

How to recognize a fake Allegacy email

When Allegacy sends you an email, we always include the last four digits of your Member Number in the upper right corner (example, xxxx1234). If an email seems suspicious, you can contact us to verify its legitimacy.

We will never contact you with a request for sensitive information, like your account number, social security number or password. If you didn’t initiate contact, the request is not from us. The only time in which we’d ask for private data is if you’re the one who started the conversation and a secure channel is being used, such as Secure Email or Secure Chat within WebBanking.

Our website will never prompt you for sensitive information. That goes for WebBanking too. We will also never ask you to send private data over email.

How to protect yourself from identify theft

Take smart precautions

Sign up for eStatments, so your financial information doesn’t have to go through the mail. Log into WebBanking™ to enroll.

Before throwing out any sensitive documents, shred them. If you don’t own a shredder, use a shredding service; many office supply stores and shipping or printing businesses offer this. A cross-cut shredder is more secure that a strip shredder since it cuts the paper into countless pieces and can’t be reconstructed.

Clean out your wallet. Carry only what you need – your driver’s license, debit card and credit card. Never carry your social security card in your wallet. This will make it easier to close and restore your accounts if your wallet is lost or stolen.

Keep a copy of all important financial contact information in your records, including all the 800-numbers on the backs of your debit and credit cards. Store this info somewhere secure, not in your wallet.

Keep private information private. Don’t post your address or phone number on social media sites. All it takes is a few pieces of information for a thief to steal your identity and account information.

Consider enrolling in a credit monitoring service through one of the major credit reporting agencies. If they detect any suspicious activity, you’ll  be contacted right away.

What if your identity is stolen?

Place a fraud alert with one of the three credit agencies; whichever one you choose will inform the other two. A fraud alert will make it harder for someone to open new accounts in your name.

If a physical theft took place – for example, if your home or car was broken into – file a report with your local police department.

Contact the financial institutions for any accounts that may have been compromised, including credit card companies, banks or credit unions.

File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.

For more info on what to do, both immediately and down the road, visit the FTC consumer section on identity theft. In addition to general advice, they also speak to identity theft incidents affecting children, medical records and taxes.

Common tactics of cyber criminals

Phishing

Fraudsters send emails (or other communications) that look like they come from a legit source, trying to trick you into handing over sensitive info

Pharming

Criminals can redirect traffic from a trusted website to a fraudulent lookalike, where you’re prompted to “verify your account” using private data

Malware

Malware is “malicious software” – when downloaded, it can secretly record your keystrokes, attack your computer and steal your personal information

Security concerns?

If you think your account may have been compromised, contact us.

contact us

Third Party Site Disclaimer

 

You are now leaving the Allegacy Federal Credit Union website. The Credit Union does not operate this alternate site to which you are linking and is not responsible for the content of the website nor any transactions performed on this website. Privacy and security policies may differ from those practiced by the Credit Union.

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